Changing Perspectives: Black Student Union

Changing Perspectives: Black Student Union

By Wesley Dismuke

Contributing Writer, ’17, Political Science

BSU

During a September Black Student Union meeting, a film was shown which sparked a lively and  powerful discussion about several topics related to African American culture and experiences. During our discussion, we learned that one of our new freshmen members was of Jamaican descent and could speak fluent Creole. Reflecting on this newfound diversity in our group, senior member Shelby Stephen posted to Facebook, “I seriously just made a friend who could possibly teach me Creole in a French Dialect. If you didn’t know, I’m half Haitian and know zero. Just little things like that make me so happy to have BSU.” After reading Shelby’s post, I promptly had an “aha moment:” I realized the sense of unity and togetherness that BSU had helped to create amongst its members. I also realized how far we have come as an organization in such a short time. Read more

Every Place Has Something to It: A Shakespearean Sci-Fi Writer’s Journey to LaGrange

Every Place Has Something to It: A Shakespearean Sci-Fi Writer’s Journey to LaGrange

By Ben Fuller

Copy Editor, ’16, English

Twitter photo (2014_04_23 17_50_18 UTC)

The LaGrange College English Department welcomed Dr. Patricia Marchesi at the start of the 2015 fall semester. As one of the college’s newest faculty members, Dr. Marchesi specializes in Renaissance literature and drama. Though she has just set foot onto the LaGrange College campus (a place completely foreign to her), she enjoys her new colleagues and is quickly becoming acquainted with the student body as she teaches several freshman composition courses during her initial semester.

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The First Word: Lasha Banks

The First Word: Lasha Banks

Lasha-BanksIntroduction from Dr. Jack Slay, English Professor: Lasha’s essay is the first one she wrote this semester for ENGL 1101 Honors. The assignment was fairly simple: respond to one or more of the ethical principles we had set up and discussed in class. Lasha’s response was bold and unique and refreshing — a glimpse into her psyche as well as a hard look at our own society. Read her essay here.

Personal Preparedness

Personal Preparedness

By Bryan Kirby

Contributing Writer, ’16, Nursing

possessionsWhile most of us think about  squeezing in naps between classes, studying, eating, or hanging out with friends, we need to take a few minutes to focus on protecting our hard-earned belongings from the crimes of theft and property damage. Whether you are a freshmen with just a few precious belongings to remind you of home, or a non-traditional student with a house and a collection of stuff, you value those items and want them protected. Here are a few simple techniques that will help keep your stuff where it belongs: with you.

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The Hilltop News Launches the Fall Special Issue Theme “The Network”

The Hilltop News Launches the Fall Special Issue Theme “The Network”

By Emily Webb

Editor-in-Chief, ’17, English

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In 1976, the movie Network was released. The film, about a television network dealing with low ratings, ranked #64 on American Film Institute’s Greatest Movies of All Time list. It is from this film we received the classic line, “I’m mad as hell and I’m not going to take this anymore!” a refrain that disaffected TV audiences shout from their windows into the streets.

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The First Word: Erin Missroon

The First Word: Erin Missroon

Erin-MissroonIntroduction from Dr. Amanda Kellogg, English Professor: Erin Missroon’s essay “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern: Unravelling Reality” (written for my Honors English 1102 course) offers a thoughtful and sophisticated explication of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Tom Stoppard’s reimagined version of Hamlet. Stoppard’s play, which features non-sequiturs, irony, and unnerving direct addresses to the audience, often proves challenging for students to read and write about, but Erin’s essay shows how thoroughly she has understood and appreciated the eccentricities of this, one of my favorite plays. Arguing that Stoppard constructs an “anti-play,” Erin proposes cogent answers to the question “How does postmodern literature interact with (and possibly change) its audience?” Erin’s reading not only draws on such sophisticated theoretical questions. It also demonstrates mastery of the literary critical vocabulary and the close reading skills I expect from junior- and senior-level English majors. Read her essay here.